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Win – Win?

I recently wrote a piece for the 2016 Open Source Yearbook . My piece was called "5 Initiatives that pushed the free software envelope in Europe in 2016" (no, there was no subtitle like "Number 3 will make you cry!"). The piece looked at legislation and policies adopted in the public sector in Germany, Brussels (for the whole of the EU), the Netherlands, Russia, and Bulgaria.

Dear Ubuntu User Reader,

I recently wrote a piece for the 2016 Open Source Yearbook [1]. My piece was called "5 Initiatives that pushed the free software envelope in Europe in 2016" (no, there was no subtitle like "Number 3 will make you cry!"). The piece looked at legislation and policies adopted in the public sector in Germany, Brussels (for the whole of the EU), the Netherlands, Russia, and Bulgaria.

Being vain, I tweeted about it when it came out. Most people just liked the tweet or re-tweeted it. But one of my followers replied with "Hey! What about Spain?" He and I both live in Spain. At one point, Spain, or at least parts of it, was at the forefront of the adoption of Free Software in public administration [2]. So why didn't Spain make the grade?

[...]

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